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launched by the u.s. and other countries. president obama again making the case for why the u.s. went in, but how does it end? >>> in japan, the disaster deepens with new problems at the nuclear plant. there are new fears about food safety and an american family has received the worst possible news about their daughter. our teams are on the ground. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. in addition to two wars on two other fronts, the united states military tonight is engaged against libya. the attacks are in the form of air strikes. 32 of them in just the last 24 hours. about half now being carried out by u.s. aircraft. and there have been 136 cruise missiles launched. only eight of them by british armed forces. the rest launched by the u.s. they have hit targets up and down the libyan coastline, mostly aimed at libyan defenses, so the coalition aircraft can begin enforcing that no-fly zone over a larger portion of the country. the united states says moammar gadhafi is not a target personally, but president obama says the u.s. acted in
, who warned that u.s. military personnel and u.s. citizens in japan should actually go back to a radius of 80 kilometers around fukushima. japan has said 20 kilometers, so it seems that the u.s. has an assessment that is fairly serious. >> any idea if they are following the french lead, recommending that they leave japan altogether? >> we have not had any word on that from the united states government. i think that would be much further for the u.s. in the sense that the u.s. has so many people in the country, currently 50,000 u.s. troops currently in japan get there is concern. the u.s. government says it is monitoring -- currently in japan. there is concern. the u.s. government says it is monitoring the situation. there is no thought that anyone residing in the u.s. is at risk. >> but with 34 u.s. experts landing on wednesday, joining seven others, all with an american equipment, the u.s. is having to answer questions about whether it even trusts japan completely. >> a slight difference from what we are hearing out of japan and from the united states. i think it is worth pointing out
in washington president obama is facing lots of criticism for the u.s. mission in libya. two and a half hours from now he'll try to ease concerns about the operation's goals, its costs and the end game. his remarks coming a little over a week from the first coalition air strikes and critical time for opposition fighters on the ground. gadhafi's troops wiped out some of the gains but in recent days coalition air strikes have helped rebels seize some of the northern stays. now to reza sayah with more on benghazi. what's the latest information, ressa, that you are getting. >> reporter: these forces had an impressive three days capturing five towns from the gadhafi forces. today they finally met some resistance, the first in about 72 hours. that resistance coming in the city of sirte, gadhafi's birthplace, his hometown. when you talk to opposition officials here they anticipated a fights there and they got t.rebel figorces pushing back a one rebel fighter telling cnn that he and a group of other fighters cornelio sommaruga gadhafi soldiers waving a right flag, that, of course, the universal signa
military action. how far will the u.s. and its allies go to enforce a u.n.-authorized no-fly zone? also this hour, a new level of crisis at japan's crippled snuk power plant. as the race goes on to heat down those reactors, officials now say this disaster is on par with the worst nuclear accident in u.s. history and mile after mile of destruction, search and rescue crews barely know where to begin. we're with emergency teams risking their own lives to save others. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> president obama says the world has given moammar gadhafi ample warning that his bloody assault on rebel forces will not stand. mr. obama putting gadhafi on notice just a while ago, a day after the u.n. security council approved the use of force to protect civilians in libya. the president says the libyan leader would commit atrocities if left unchecked and thousands of people could die. >> these terms are not subject to negotiation. if gadhafi does not comply with the resolution, the international community will impose consequences. and the resolution will be enforce enforc
of the globe and japan and the u.s. it would follow a little possible parcel of radiation all the way across the country and pacific. it would take many days. a lot of the radiation would be gone. there's just no threat. >> we will see. you'll keep watching, it as will i, but thanks so much for watching it here. want to turn things over to jessica yellin in "the situation room." jess, to you. >> happening now, breaking news. three nuclear reactors damaged to the core. the crisis in japan is said to be deteriorating right now. u.s. officials are suggesting the situation is more dire than many thought. with america's top nuclear watchdogs saying radiation levels are extremely high. freezing cold and snow adding to the hardship for quake and tsunami survivors there and hampering the rescue and recovery. more people now seem eager to get out of japan all together. >>> and wolf blitzer's one-on-one interview with secretary of state hillary clinton in egypt. she's talking about the disaster in japan, as well as the uprisings in libya and across the region. welcome to our viewers in the united stat
employees. >>> breaking news overnight. u.s. and allied forces bomb libyan targets as "operation odyssey dawn" is under way. and moments ago, we got new word on the success of the campaign so far. >>> and new word from libya's leader this morning as well, as antiaircraft fire from gadhafi forces, they lit up the skies of tripoli throughout the night there. >>> the day's other big story, fallout from the japanese quake even a week after the tsunami. this new and frightening video is surfacing. the very latest from there in moments. good morning, everyone, i'm alex witt. welcome to "msnbc sunday." we begin with breaking news. >>> new word from the top u.s. military chief just moments ago. admiral mike mullen tells nbc news a no-fly zone is in effect in libya this morning after american and european forces rained down missiles on libya's defenses. the u.s. and britain unleashed 114 tomahawk cruise missiles targeting libyan surface-to-air sites as well as radar and communications centers. three american b-2 stealth bombers also dropped more than 40 bombs on libyan defenses. now, the goal of
are without food, clean water and electricity. we have team coverage from the epicenter of thedy sast to the u.s. greg, what is the latest? >> a cold dark night here in the fishing village and the folks probably went to bed thinking of what the prime minister had to say. he told them it would take determination to get them through this. just up the coast, the nuclear complex with so much problems in the past couple of days, today, another reactor facing the possibility of a meltdown. they say they are in control of the situation. but the evacuation from the region around the reactors continues and the possibility of poisoning from radioactivity also going forward. dozens are testing positive for that. now to the number. there is one official here, in one region who said yesterday that 10,000 people were missing. now he is saying he feels that 10,000 people are dead in his region alone. that may add to the figure. we traveled today and we notice shortages are a problem. of food, of fuel and power in this village, of everything people need to get by. that is why relief is rushing to this area. tod
, if you are just waking up. fresh word from the nation's top military officer after u.s. and coalition forces bombarded libya's defenses overnight. admiral mike mullen tells nbc news there is a no-fly zone in place in libya. that's after more than 110 tomahawk cruise missiles from warships and submarines slammed the antiaircraft units and command posts. admiral mullen also said that possible outcome of the military action could include the embattled leader, moammar gadhafi, remaining in power. meanwhile, gadhafi issued an audio address on state tv, saying the country was preparing for a long war. on the screen, the image of a giant, gold fist crushing an american plane. nbc's jim maceda's in libya's capital of tripoli. jim, with another good day to you, we have cruise missiles that were targeting sites around the city there. what's it like there now? >> reporter: here, it's quiet. it wasn't so at 2:30, 3:00 in the morning, though, alex. we all jumped and jolted first when we heard a number of explosions. it was these deep thuds that you never like to hear. they could have been cruise m
u.s. destroyers in the mediterranean and three u.s. sub marines and one british sub marine. they were fired off of those at 2:00 p.m. eastern time. takes about an hour flying time for the tomahawks to strike their targets. there were about 20 targets evenly divided between the capital of tripoli as well as misred aed ta where we he do understand from reports on the ground that an air force academy was targeted there as well as the main air base that qadaffi has. also, two strikes against sert, the hometown of qadaffi but none against benghazi where the rebels are holed up. they wanted to avoid any casualties in benghazi. >> judge jeanine: that, of course, being the rebel stronghold. we are now six hours into the cruz missile attack. is it true that it will take in fact hours more for us to know the full extent of the cruz missile attacks? >> reporter: i think they are starting to get some reports. one u.s. defense official says that qadaffi's defense systems basically an sa 5 old soviet era defense system, ironically the same that was used by saddam hussein exactly 8 years
-blown meltdown, as the u.s. authorizes the first evacuations full-blown meltdown, as the u.s. authorizes the first evacuations of american citizens. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody, and thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. the united states will begin evacuating americans out of japan amid growing concern over the nuclear plant crisis. here's the latest. japanese military helicopters have begun dumping water on the crippled power plant to try to cool overheated nuclear fuel. engineers are trying to install a new power line so they can restore power to the plant's cooling system. a top u.s. nuclear official says he believes radiation levels at the plant are extremely high, and will soon be deadly. the obama administration has urged the evacuation of all americans from a 50-mile radius of the fukushima daiichi plant. now, charter planes will be brought in to help those wanting to leave the country. charlie d'agata is in yoshida, japan, with more on this. good morning, charlie. tell us the latest where you are. >> good morning to you, betty. well, you may be wonderi
after soaring radiation forces a retreat. and the u.s. tells americans to evacuate a 50-mile danger zone. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the question everyone in this country is asking: could it happen here? the u.s. has 23 nuclear reactors just like those in japan. how safe are they and we? and as the search goes on for victims of the earthquake and tsunami, an american exchange teacher is among the missing. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. they have what could be the most dangerous job in the world, and the world is rooting for them to get it done. the nuclear power plant workers in japan trying to prevent a meltdown. radiation at the dai-ichi plant in fukushima got so high today they were forced to leave temporarily, but now they're back on the job. japan has raised the maximum radiation dose allowed for nuclear workers so they can deal with the crisis, but the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told congress today the doses those workers could be
. at the same time, the united states began evacuating americans from japan and u.s. officials reminded those staying behind to get out of that 50-mile danger zone around the fukushima dai-ichi plant. the reactors damaged by friday's earthquake and tsunami were bombarded today with water mr. from helicopters, police water cannons and fire trucks to try to cool them off and prevent a meltdown, but it's not at all clear if it's working. and in washington, the head of the nuclear regulatory commission said it could take weeks to get these reactors under control. bill whitaker in japan begins our coverage. >> reporter: this new video released today gives the clearest picture yet of the stricken fukushima dai-ichi nuclear power plant. >> what we're seeing is that the damage from the fires is very significant. >> reporter: today, japanese military helicopters with protective led-lined cockpits dumped water on reactor three, attempting to cool the nuclear fuel rods. but much of the water appeared to disperse in the wind. police and firefighters also brought in water cannons to douse the reactor but
>> couric: tonight, as allied forces pound targets in libya, the u.s. military insists qaddafi is not a target, but the commander in chief makes it clear... >> it is u.s. policy that qaddafi needs to go. >> couric: i'm katie couric. also tonight, another setback in japan. workers again forced to evacuate as smoke pours from crippled nuclear reactors and concerns grow about the safety of japan's food supply. and another a.t.f. agent tells cbs news the agency encouraged gun dealers in this country to sell weapons to mexican drug cartels. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. for a third straight night, tripoli has come under attack from u.s. and allied forces as they establish a no-fly zone over libya. anti-aircraft fire lit up the sky as moammar qaddafi's army tried to defend against the attack. rebels solidified their control in benghazi and launch and offensive to retake other cities. president obama said today the u.s. will turn over leadership of the opera
there is no sign dangerous radiation is coming here. >>> good evening. as we come on the air tonight, the u.s. navy is now racing to the rescue in japan. where there is word that electricity is about to return to the fukushima nuclear plant, and the u.s. is flying in five giant pumps from a navy base in nagasaki. they are pumps that can deliver enormous amounts of water, after we all watched today as the helicopters tried to spray water, but to no avail. our reporters are out in force on the story tonight. and we will go to japan in a moment. but first, let's head to martha raddatz who has been talking all day to the u.s. officials who are now helping the japanese. martha? >> reporter: diane, every day, the nuclear monster seems to get more frightening. but there is some hope tonight from that big u.s. push to send in water pumps. this coming after last ditch efforts by the japanese failed. one expert told us it's like using a squirt gun to put out a forest fire. japanese fire trucks using riot control water hoses to tackle red hot nuclear reactors. helicopters swooping overhead, dropping bucket af
near me. i am greg gutfeld and i will see you soon. the u.s. and its allies continue attacks on government forces. the lawmakers here wonder what is the end game? this is as uprising spread to other nations raising bigger questions about the region. group of g.o.p. presidential hopefuls head to iowa. live from the studio in washington, this is "special report." i'm jim angele in for bret baier. african countries are calling for transition to lead to the democratic connections in libya. libyan government delegation is meeting in ethiopia with five african heads of state who want a roadmap for political reform there. political leaders don't have representative at the meeting. coalition forces continue to pound those loyal to gaddafi. the national correspondent jennifer griffin explains why cit exit is likely not in cards. >> good evening. on day seven of the operation over libya, command of the operation still in question and not likely to be settled before sunday at the earliest. >> a transition process that will take through the weekend, more allied pilots begone taking the l
weapons of the nato alliance, like this air strike by britain. and yet, u.s. military officials concede today that the libyan regime is still determined to fight and reinforced its positions in the eastern cities fwh including ajdabiya. the occasion says gadhafi is trying to recruit and arm volunteers to fight rebel forces. the libyan strongman defiant as nato moves to take over command of the libyan mission. the top u.s. commander of the operation tells me that nato has now agreed in principle to not only take charge of the no-fully zone but to also to protect libyan civilians as well. the details will be worked out, he says, over the next few erda. general carter ham sending a message directly to gadhafi. here in "the situation room," we spoke just a littlewhilego and i had this exchange with him. cnn is seen live around the world, including in libya. and officer your military-to-military -- the officers surrounding gadhafi might be watching right now, gadhafi might be watching, his sons might be watching. look into atthe camera. what would you say to them right now, officer t officer
and the u.s. nuclear chief says the water evaporated. if they are exposed they can catch fire, melt, and release large amounts of ridation into the air. we are told crews are still working on a new power line that would restore the electricity there in theory and get the water pumps back up and running. officials say the cold snap is slowing down their effort but not word on when that cable might be connected. in the meantime, 200 courageous plant workers, 180 of them, are jack belling to cool the reactors by hand. they are risking their lives to prevent a catastrophe. a total meltdown is a stunning blow after the earthquake and tsunami that devastated the northeast portion of japan. we got dramatic new video to fox of people trying to save eve other as the monster wave swept through the town. look at this. (speaking japanese). >>shepard: a week later search teams are still digging for the dead. and survivors gather what is last of their belongings. but for many, there is simply nowhere to go. expire towns are wiped off the map and it will take likely years to rebuild. so we will ge
, this time at reactor number 4. martha: the u.s. officials say the next 28-48 hours are critical in stopping and cooling down what's going on inside these reactors. if it doesn't happen, this area could be deadly for many years to come. good morning julian. tell me what the latest is from where you are. >> reporter: i think have much the efforts today to put cold water on the reactors has failed. the helicopters have only marginally put as much water as they wanted to on the reactors. it doesn't seem to be having a regular effect. all hopes rest with the crews trying to link up the electricity line back into the plant that will then allow them to restart the generators which automatically pump cold water onto these heated up reactors and bring temperatures down. all other efforts seem to have failed. the attempt to use fire engines to pump cold water on the reactors has failed. they are look at a single solution now. martha: it sounds like it's up to these people known as the fukushima 50, 180 workers rotating in and out of the plant to limit their own exposure to the radiation. what a coura
coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. rick: officials in japan are calling it a race against time. we have video for you of water being dropped into the overheating reactors at the fukushima plant. this is something that has not proven successful in the past. japan is raising the severity of the situation from a 4 to a 5. the government is acknowledging that it was overwhelmed and continues to be overwhelmed by the situation. gavin blair is on the phone from japan. i understand you are traveling to sendai, which is one of the areas hardest hit by this catastrophy. >> reporter: we just popped through the u.s. exclusion zone or the japanese he can collusion zone. it has been reclassified up to a 5. the chopper missions to drop water has had minimal effect on cool the plant. they tried hosing the plant with fire engines. but apparently the fire truck hoses couldn't reach the plant. however, having said that, the levels of radiation in tokyo have returned to normal. apparently the italian embassy found that levels of radiation were a fifth of what they were in r
. and so modelers, the u.s. government, can see every level of the atmosphere. and if a piece of radiation, a big piece of radiation, a meltdown occurs, they will be able to run the models and figure out where that ra radiation's going to go. >> if there's a meltdown, as we know from chernobyl, this can kae. we have been talking about the amount of radiation that is likely released. it is not likely to have had some major effect across ocean. >> slight breaking news we haven't had on air yet. fukushima daiichi is what we have been talking about. >> right. >> shawn, zoom in. there's another plant ten miles south of there and they have issued a ten kilometer radius evacuation to that plan. this has literally happened in the past few hours. >> what is that? a fire? >> we literally doesn't know. >> some emergency. >> enough of an emergency that the people that are living around this plant are being forced to move. there's already a 30 kilometer around daiichi. >> must be unsettling to not know. he made the point, there are people who don't think the government's lying to them, they just don't
report. >> it's just the beginning. >> the u.s. and allies, now seeing the effects of a full scale military operation to stop libya's leader, muammar gaddafi. >> and effectively he hasn't flown any in the last few days, i would say the no-fly zone is effectively in place. >> harris: that was 24 hours ago, and tonight, fox reports live from tripoli. what our journalists on the ground are seeing now. plus, life saving supply already running low in japan's devastation zone. now traces of radiation found in even more food sources. but a month a frantic rush to contain a nuclear disaster. >> earthquake survivors pulled from the wreckage. we're live from japan where a new day begins. we begin tonight with a heavy bombardment by coalition forces inside libya. mixed messages by muammar gaddafi who has called for a new cease-fire and promises to fight to the death at the same time. here is where we stand. the fog calling operation odyssey dawn a success and we're told the no-fly zone is now in effect and cruise missiles and long range bombers have taken out a number of key targets including
plants right here in the united states. >>> and will the u.s. supreme court green light a massive discrimination lawsuit against walmart? arguments today in one of the most important workers' rights cases the court has ever heard. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> moammar gadhafi and his troops are being accused of new carnage and destruction. just hours after president obama tried to explain the u.s. mission in libya to the american people. this hour we have breaking news. we're learning about major, major setbacks for rebel forces in several cities. in misrata, witnesses say government forces are hammering the city hard, firing bullets over civilians' heads and telling them to run for their lives. gadhafi is fighting back with a vengeance against rebels who had regained ground in recent days under the cover of coalition air strikes. >>> and joining us now in ajdabiya is our own arwa damon. you're with the rebels there. how are they doing, arwa? what's the latest? >> reporter: well, wolf, it's been another bitterly disappointing day for the opposition here. th
how there's assassination attempt on colonel gaddafi, u.s. officials at the pentagon have already said they're not targeting gaddafi. that doesn't rule out that a strike took place, but i think there's some skepticism about any claims made pie this government. they're clearly operating a propaganda war as well as a war on the ground and they've been dead wrong on major statements in the past and i think there's a question mark whether this was in fact an attempt and whether that attempt happened recently, from the damage shown, it was an administration building, there's no report of casualties. gaddafi's compound itself is a huge, four block complex, it's like four city blocks surrounded by a 12 foot high wall. it's a big operation there and the administrative building is in ruins, but when it was hit, when it was destroyed, really, a question mark at this point, despite the government's claims. >> harris: yeah, very excellent points about that. pushing forward with propaganda, we should mention gaddafi has been in power there for four decades, the guy knows how to spin it. we'll see w
senators gary hart and norm coleman assess president obama's decision to use u.s. military power in libya. >> ifill: then, we get a report from a japan battered by nuclear disaster and now facing elevated radiation levels in its tap water. >> lehrer: miles o'brien looks at the future for u.s. nuclear power in the wake of the japan crisis. >> ifill: ray suarez reports on how the north african nation of morocco is working to avoid becoming the next target of regional unrest. >> reporter: in washington, morocco's foreign minister gave us an overview of king mohammed's planned reforms for a country facing some of the same discontents as its neighbors. >> you know what i feel like? i feel all the time like a cat on a hot tin roof! >> lehrer: and jeffrey brown remembers legendary film star elizabeth taylor who died today at age 79. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people des
in benghazi and launch and offensive to retake other cities. president obama said today the u.s. will turn over leadership of the operation to other nations within days. the president and british prime minister david cameron said qaddafi must go though they insisted he is not a target of the attacks. but a cruise missile attack last night may have been too close for comfort for the libyan dictator. mark phillips is in tripoli. >> reporter: of all the targets that have been hit in these attacks, this flattened building in the qaddafi compound in tripoli is the one the qaddafi loyalists have complained about most. this is the attack they claim was launched to kill him. despite the hundreds of people who have gathered or been gathered around the complex to provide protection. >> families, children, men and women have come from everywhere to stay day and night to protect this location, to protect this location and the rocket hits only 52 to 100 meters away from them. >> reporter: qaddafi himself was probably not in his tent. he hasn't been seen since before the bombing began. his location a se
, and the u.s. are scrambling to enforce a no-fly zone over libya now that the u.n. security council has authorized all necessary measures. cnn international correspondent nic robertson is live in tripoli. good morning, nic. >> reporter: good morning, christine. well, we've already heard from the deputy foreign minister here who says he doesn't expect immediate air strikes here, but wouldn't say what preparations the army or anyone else in the country may be taking to defend the country with this new u.n. resolution. when he was asked about the cease-fire that the resolution calls for, he seemed to indicate that the government here was going to take some time to do that. they didn't have anyone to negotiate with that they would put it in place. but this was something that was going to take time. seemed to hint that the army here may plan to continue with some of its offensive. that offensive was going on in the east, and we have no updated information from that front line this morning, christine. >> does this u.n. resolution paint -- does it paint them into a corner, gadhafi and his alli
? and in japan nuclear chaos. tonight, how the newest trouble forced workers and the u.s. navy to clear the area. first from fox this monday night, the desperation tactics of muammar qaddafi. we are seeing new evidence that the dictator is using human shields to keep international coalition to keep from hitting key targets. this as america unleashes fireplace in yet another conflict in the middle east. this, the scene over tripoli just hours ago as antiaircraft fire streak through the night's sky, searching for any coalition aircraft. allied military leaders have been working to establish a no-fly zone over libya. in an effort to prevent qaddafi from attacking his own people. commanders are also targeting libyan troops who threaten civilians they tell us. we are told war planes focused a lot of their fireplace near the eastern city of benghazi, carrier jets reportedly dropped at least 12 bombs there overnight. >> and through a variety of reports, we know that regime ground forces that were in the vicinity of benghazi now possess little will or capability to resume offensive operations. >> u.s. a
. >> shepard: lawrence taylor on prostitutes and family. a u.s. fighter jet those down and the crew forced to eject over libyan territory. why the military has launched an investigation. libyan opposition forces are planning a new push. >> what is your plan now? >> the highway leads to be a da i ajdabiya. >> command and control business is plaintiff's complicated. >> look at who could be calling the shots and how long it will take. >> shepard: plus, qaddafi's stash of cash. the libyan leader has been hoarding oil money for decades. tonight, where he is hiding his dollars. and how qaddafi's bank balance could tip the scales of this fight. first from fox this tuesday night, the libyan leader muammar qaddafi has come out of hiding, it would appear, to address his people and shout new threats against the world. you can see him there in the cube appearing on libyan state television, assuming it's from today, this is qaddafi's first public appearance in a week. and as coalition airplanes target his military infrastructure in our new war in libya, qaddafi said his forces would defeat libya's enem
there was no risk to any u.s. territory from the reactors. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the containment operations, the ongoing exodus of people from areas close to the reactors, and new footage from when the tsunami struck six days ago. >> woodruff: and amid signs of both resilience and confusion, we look at japan's political culture in response to the disaster. >> brown: then, ray suarez has an update on libya, as the u.n. moves to a vote on establishing a no-fly zone over the country. >> woodruff: margaret warner talks to irish prime minister enda kenny about the celtic tiger's struggle to kick-start it's economy. >> brown: and tom bearden reports on a project to use private satellites to help stop genocide. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> you can't manufacture pride, but pride builds great cars. and you'll find it in the people at toyota, all across america. >> auto companies make huge profits. >> last year, chevron made a l
worrisome are the spent fuel rods in number 4. a top u.s. official warned that the rods are now exposed. a claim that japanese officials later denied. >> in addition to the three reactors operating at the time of the incident a fourth reactor is under concern. we believele there's been a hydrogen explosion in this unit due to an uncovering of the fuel in the fuel pool. we believe that secondary containment has been destroyed. there is no water in the spent fuel pool and we believe that radiation levels are extremely high. >> that does not sound good at all. the japanese government has been trying to cool all the reactors, pumping water into the plant and trying to drop water from helicopters. that had to be abandoned because of rough winds and the radiation threat. there are reports that some workers are getting sick already from radiation exposure which is not surprising. experts are working frantically to restore power to the plant which would restore the cooling system. but willç it work? what options are left if it doesn't? those are really important questions. the u.s. military h
seem to be doing their job. u.s. attorney d.c. d.c., can't have a higher investigator than that -- district of columbia, can't have a higher investigator than that. >> reporter: issa's probe caught her by surprise. >> not only did i not know about it, you would have thought as a courtesy i would have been given some notice, but the staff of the committee didn't know about it until the press release came out. >> reporter: meanwhile it appears sulaimon brown is fully cooperating with the agencies investigating his allegations. this morning he was called to the fbi again. did they ask you to bring anything? >> can't comment. >> reporter: did you bring anything? >> can't comment on that either. >> reporter: we also caught up with mayor gray at a ceremony to recognize d.c.'s use of green energy, but he didn't want to talk about the controversy. >> i want to stay on this, okay? i talked about the house last night. i want to stay on this. this is a good news story and i want to stay with that. thank you. >> reporter: congresswoman norton says she spoke to chairman issa today by ph
>>> breaking news this thursday morning. >> getting out. overnight, the u.s. government announces plans to airlift americans from danger. >> it's because of the critical situation at the devastated nuclear plant. workers on a race against time before radiation spreads. but one expert tells abc news, it's almost too late. >>> and good morning, everyone. i'm mike marusarz, in for rob nelson. >> and i'm peggy bunker. despite little radiation risk in most of japan, this morning, there's a race to leave the country. >> for the first time, the u.s. has authorized the evacuation of family members of american diplomats. charter planes are being used to fly americans away from danger. >> and the u.s. is pressuring japan to step up its efforts to avert a nuclear meltdown. they dropped sea water on the crippled reactors today. a heroic step, since the pilots are risking their lives to complete that mission. >> and the tokyo stock market, dropping once again. >>> it was a night of high-level phone calls over the nuclear crisis, as president obama spoke to the japanese prime minister. >> while
. still, u.s. warships and planes helping with relief efforts temporarily moved away from the area as a precaution. crews have been desperately trying to avoid a nuclear meltdown at the facility since it was damaged in friday's powerful earthquake. over the weekend they dumped sea water into the reactors to try to cool them down. more than 180,000 residents were also evacuated, and had to be scanned for radiation before entering shelters. across the northeast coast, more than 10,000 people are believed to be dead from the magnitude 9 quake, and tsunami. dramatic new video captured violent waves that slammed ashore, wiping out entire villages. since the massive earthquake three days ago, aftershocks continue to rattle the region. an average of 12 to 15 per hour. some more than 6.0 in magnitude. but there are stories of survival. crews rescued this 60-year-old man who was clinging to what was left of his roof. this man also made it out alive. i thought i was dying when i was pushed into the water, he says. but with thoughts of my family i decided to make every effort to survive. but
room." >>> now, breaking news. urgent new teams to cool down an overheated reactor. now the u.s. government is stepping in to evacuate possibly thousands of americans from the country and get them away from any nuclear danger. secretary of state hillary clinton tells our wolf blitzer she's worried about the health and saved of americans in japan even as she heads home from tunis tunisia. i'm candy crowley, you're in "the situation room." nuclear experts say the new attempt to douse an overheated reactor has been somewhat effective. helicopters, fire trucks and police water cannons all have been deployed. we are told that radiation levels dipped, but they are still high, so the frarchtic work to prevent a full-scale meltdown goes on. cnn's anna coren is nil tokyo. just bring us up to date. >> well, candidate, it's entering the seventh day of this crisis, and now at the fukushima daiichi plant trying to bring this situation under control. we saw the pictures of the helicopters, trying to spray water onto the reactors. those crews had to get out because of the radiation levels incr
radiation levels have been detected outside the 20-mile emergency perimeter. the head of the u.s. nuclear agency says there is no more water in the spent fuel pool at the reactor plant. greg palkot is live in teak owe where it's just -- tokyo where it's just after 7:00 in the morning. good morning, greg. what does this mean? >> hey, bret. it's actually pretty serious. in fact, one of the worst case scenarios that have been bandied about. if true, the rods could get hotter and hotter and meltdown and shower radiation over a broad area. it must be said the japanese authorities are denying the report. but just one of several challenges that the authorities have been dealing with, in the last 24 hours. the problems with the stricken fukushima nuclear complex in northeastern japan change by the hour. on wednesday, a new fire ignited at one reactor and radioactive steam burst from another. it prompted remaining workers to be yanked and more residents to flee the area. >> if the fuel rods are exposed the radiation material inside the container could seep out. >> it's also causing the people of t
with the crisis, but the head of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told congress today the doses those workers could be exposed to are potentially lethal in a short period of time. it's nearly six days now since the earthquake and tsunami killed at least 4300 people and damaged the nuclear reactors. today, u.s. officials told americans within 50 miles of the plant to evacuate the area or stay indoors. that is two and a half times as wide as the danger zone established by the japanese. harry smith begins tonight's coverage of the disaster in japan. >> reporter: in a sign of how grave japan's crisis has become, the emperor, akihito, made an unprecedented television address, acknowledging that he is deeply worried, urging his subjects not to give up. it did little to calm a country increasingly distrustful, given the wave of conflicting reports and mixed messages. >> ( translated ): there is both positive and negative news. i don't know which i should believe. >> reporter: and today on capitol hill, u.s. energy secretary and nuclear expert steven chu said he, too, is baffled. >> and ther
clear that no u.s. boots will be on the ground in libya but how long air strikes by u.s. pilots will continue is on everyone's mind right now. those strikes, which include six more tomahawk missile strike have led to a rapid sweep of forces east to west. in the past 49 hours, rebels from taken key towns and striking at sirte, as we speak, the hometown of moammar gadhafi. nbc's chuck todd live at white house here. some of the president's critic says he should have given the speech that we're expecting tonight before the strikes began. >> reporter: well, look, there was even some debate among some supporters of the president on that very notion. but that's -- that's not going to happen. you can't turn back the clock. so the decision was made. they would wait until there was -- they were done with the u.s. portion of this. and so, it's not a mere coincidence that when the handover to nato to run this no-fly zone is taking place, that the president is going to use the occasion to both make the case for why he made this decision, number one, and number two, it's going to be valedicto
of action, now comes the patrolling of a no-fly zone over libya. that's the word from africa. u.s. military's africa command describes phase two of an allied campaign to protect libyan civilians from their own government. the action phase include add cruise missile strike on the heart of moammar gadhafi's compound in tripoli. libyan officials say no one was hurt, and the allies say gadhafi is not being targeted. the bombed out building supposedly house add military command and control center. after well over 100 missile launches on saturday, an efricon spokesman says operation odyssey dawn as it's called may have peaked. nine other members and nato may take the lead, though that is still being decide. and libyan fighters are still on the move. word from misrata east of tripoli, gadhafi's tanks unleashed absolute destruction and carnage. a witness says they are shooting people in the main street. an exclusive cnn poll finds broad american support for the allied mission. more than 80% say protecting libyans from their longtime dictator should be a somewhat or very important goal of the u.s. b
of the stricken reactor is at the fukushima plant. radiation continues to spread from the site. u.s. engineers and others are explaining their options of containing the leak. >> in the small village 40 kilometers northeast of fukushima, while outside detroit exclusion zone, the people living here thought they were safe -- northeast of fukushima, well east -- outside of the exclusion zone. >> this has exceeded the data. >> the latest news from fukushima also offers no grounds for optimism. yvette tb's do not know when or even if they will be able to return home -- in evacuees -- the evacuees do not know. >> we do not know when the situation will normalize, and we do not think there will be a future for us in the city. >> operator tepco has decided to decommission four of the reactors. filling them up may be necessary. >> government and experts are considering but these four buildings at the fukushima-dai- ichi plant to stop the spread of the substances. >> a they will spray it with a synthetic resin to try to prevent radioactive dust from being blown away or being watched to see. in a refugee c
along the country's northeastern coast. american military officials confirm that more u.s. service members were exposed to radiation today and treated with iodine. but because of the wind direction, several navy ships moved closer to the coast after initial pullback of radiation concerns two major aftershocks rattled japan today, causing buildings to sway in tokyo. food, water and heat shortages continue. correspondent adam housley has the latest. >> they is survived the fifth largest earthquake in history and tsunami that devoured everything in its path. now hundreds of thousands of survivors face nuclear exposure and health dangers that may not show for years. >> 11,000 micro-sievert is equivalent of the exposure you get a year if you live a normal life. if you stay in the place for one hour you may be exposed to 11,000. we have to watch this. >> radiation is leaking from two nuclear reactors along the pacific coast heavily damaged by the earthquake. on tuesday, another explosion shook the region, damaging a containment pool and exposing part or all of the nuclear fuel rods insid
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